Germinated Brown Rice

Germinated Thai Jasmine Brown Rice and Germinated Sticky Brown Rice in a vacuum pack of 1 kilogram

New Crop Germinated Thai Jasmine Brown Rice - New Harvest, No Chemicals, No Pesticides
New Crop Germinated Thai Sticky Brown Rice - New Harvest, No Chemicals, No Pesticides

Sansaket Farm

  • Germinated Thai Jasmine Brown Rice, 1 kg Vacuum Pack - 125 THB ≈ 3.60 EUR
  • Germinated Thai Sticky Brown Rice, 1 kg Vacuum Pack - 125 THB ≈ 3.60 EUR

Contact us now to buy this new crop germinated brown rice - Jasmine or Sticky.

Germinated rice, often referred to as germinated brown rice (GBR), and GABA rice, is in essence sprouted brown rice. The natural germination process increases nutrients that are related to a number of health benefits. Cooked germinated rice is softer and tastes mellower than its unsprouted brown rice cousin.

Our wholesome Germinated Thai Brown Rice is great for any recipe calling for white rice or brown rice.

Details

Rice Harvest Monsoon Season 2018. Location on the map: > Sansaket Farm Rice Field.

Germinated Thai Jasmine Brown Rice

  • Plants: Genuine native Thai Jasmine long-grain rice, Thai Hom Mali (original/non-GMO)
  • Conditions: Rainy season 2018, hand planted, natural fertilizer, no chemicals, no pesticides
  • Fertilizer: Cured, derived from > domestic wild boars
  • Water: Rain and reservoir > Mae Khuang Dam, with a drone
  • Harvested: 15 November 2018
  • Certified arsenic-free rice: 3/4 December 2018 - Arsenic: Not detected
  • Milling & packaging: Huai Hong Khrai Royal Development Study Center, Doi Saket
  • GJR2019AV Dehusked: 27 November 2018
  • GJR2019AV Vacuum packaged: 27 November 2018 (2018-11-27)
  • GJR2019AV Best used before: 27 May 2019 (2019-05-27)
  • Increase shelf life by refrigeration

Germinated Thai Sticky Brown Rice

  • Plants: Genuine native Thai Sticky long-grain rice, Thai Maejo 2  (original/non-GMO)
  • Conditions: Rainy season 2018, hand planted, natural fertilizer, no chemicals, no pesticides
  • Fertilizer: Cured, derived from > domestic wild boars
  • Water: Rain and reservoir > Mae Khuang Dam, with a drone
  • Harvested: 15 November 2018
  • Tested: 3/4 December 2018 - Arsenic: Not detected
  • Milling & packaging: Huai Hong Khrai Royal Development Study Center, Doi Saket
  • GSR2019AV Dehusked: 21 December 2018
  • GSR2019AV Vacuum packaged: 21 December 2018
  • GSR2019AV Best used before: 21 June 2019 (2019-06-21)
  • Increase shelf life by refrigeration

Our rice is grown without chemicals and without pesticides. It is certified arsenic free.

Germinated Brown Rice

Most probably, throughout the ages when the word rice referred exclusively to brown rice, it was germinated rice that was regarded as the most luxurious form of rice. Germinated rice is softer and has a mellower taste than unsprouted brown rice. It also has a significantly higher nutrient content, enhancing its health benefits.

In Germinated brown rice as a value added rice product: A review scientists Swati Bhauso Patil and Md. Khalid Khan of the University of Orissa, India, published in the Journal of Food Science and Technology, quote 42 scientific studies across the globe on the benefits of germinated brown rice:

Germinated rice has a higher protein content than unsprouted brown rice and white rice, and contains less calories and sugar than white rice. Germinated rice has been found to aid in better absorption during digestion and prevent intestinal irritation, inflammation, and allergies; ameliorate hyperglycemia, boost the immune system, lower blood pressure, inhibit development of cancer cells and assist the treatment of anxiety disorders.

Germinated rice is made by soaking brown rice 1 in warm water to stimulate germination and make the rice sprout.

The sprouting process activates a variety of enzymes and increases the presence of fiber and nutrients: dietary fiber, lysine, thiamine, niacin, magnesium, vitamin B1, vitamin B6, vitamin E, inositols, ferulic acid, phytic acid, tocotrienols, potassium, zinc, prolylendopeptidase inhibitor, gamma-oryzanol, gamma-aminobutyric acid aka GABA 2. For the last three:

  • Prolylendopeptidase inhibitor has a possible effect on the prevention of Alzheimer's disease
  • Gamma-oryzanol has an antioxidative effect, preventing skin aging and modulating cholesterol values;
  • Gamma-aminobutyric acid is an important neurotransmitter that affects the brain, organs and muscle tone with hypotensive effect; accelerates metabolism in brain; prevents headaches or depressions, aftereffects of cerebral arteriosclerosis and cerebral apoplexy; prevents climacteric disorder; prevents presenile derangement such as insomnia and mental irritation; activates renal function. GABA is said to promote fat loss by the stimulation of the production of Human Growth Hormone, increases the sleep cycle giving deeper rest, boosts the immune system, lowers blood pressure, inhibits development of cancer cells, assists the treatment of anxiety disorders. The GABA content of germinated rice has been shown to be twice as much as brown rice and ten times higher than white rice.

Germinated rice can be made at home from brown rice, if the brown rice is not too old. Various instructions are shown on the web. Be aware that instructions claiming the process can be completed in a few hours are incorrect.

Other interesting reading:

  • Germinated Brown Rice and its Role in Human Health (Abstract) -  Fengfeng Wu, Na Yang, Alhassane Touré, Zhengyu Jin & Xueming Xu, Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2013;53(5):451-63. https://doi.org/10.1080/10408398.2010.542259 (Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, Taylor and Francis Group)
  • https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/cereal/brown-rice.html
  • https://wholegrainscouncil.org/whole-grains-101/whole-grains-101-orphan-pages-found/health-benefits-sprouted-grains
  • https://www.instructables.com/id/HOWTO-make-GBR-germinated-or-sprouted-brown-rice/

Footnotes:

  1. White rice cannot be germinated because the whitening and polishing process has removed all the elements (nutrients) that make sprouting possible.
  2. Germinated brown rice as a value added rice product: A review - Patil, S.B. & Khan, M.K. J Food Sci Technol (2011) 48: 661. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13197-011-0232-4 (Journal of Food Science and Technology, Springer Verlag).

 

Note: The above nutrition information and possible benefits are based on nutrition research given by published professionals and specialists. Not all of these sources provide the same estimates. While there may be benefits, in our own opinion any described benefits do not represent a cure-all for specific ailments or diseases. Consult with your friendly health professional for a final, authoritative opinion.

Page last updated 30 January 2019